Units work together to transport weather satellite

Buckley

Several units from around the U.S. Air Force alongside members of Lockheed Martin came together to coordinate the loading of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series into a C-5 Galaxy aircraft Dec. 4, 2017, on Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado. The GOES-R Series will join another satellite currently in orbit to better predict weather patterns and phenomena. The C-5 Galaxy is assigned to Travis AFB, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke W. Nowakowski)

Buckley

Chris Tucker, Lockheed Martin videographer, records as the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series is loaded into a C-5 Galaxy aircraft Dec. 4, 2017, on Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado. Members assigned to the 337th Airlift Squadron at Westover, AFB, are transporting the GOES-R Series to Cape Canaveral, Florida where it will be launched into orbit. The GOES-R Series will be used to improve the accuracy of weather prediction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke W. Nowakowski)

Buckley

Tech Sgt. Steven Bouquet, 460th Logistics Readiness Squadron air transportation, and Staff Sgt. Bradley May, 460th Logistics Readiness Squadron air transportation, conduct and annotate measurements to ensure the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series is correctly balanced when loaded onto the C-5 Galaxy aircraft Dec. 4, 2017, on Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado. The total payload being transported from Buckley AFB to Cape Canaveral, FL, is more than 100 thousand pounds, making it critical that all measurements are accurate for proper transport. The C-5 Galaxy is assigned to Travis AFB, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke W. Nowakowski)

Buckley

Staff Sgt. Gabriel Mendez, 337th Airlift Squadron flight engineer, goes over a preflight checklist inside a C-5 Galaxy aircraft Dec. 4, 2017, on Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado. The 337th Airlift Squadron is a reserve unit stationed at Westover AFB in Massachusetts. The C-5 Galaxy is assigned to Travis AFB, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke W. Nowakowski)

Buckley

Airmen from the 337th Airlift Squadron look on as a wench is used to tow the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series into a C-5 Galaxy aircraft Dec. 4, 2017, on Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado. The total payload of the satellite and other equipment is greater than 100 thousand pounds. Although that may seem like a lot, the wench used to tow the GOES-R Series was only using 2/3 of its pulling capability. The C-5 Galaxy is assigned to Travis AFB, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke W. Nowakowski)

Buckley

Personnel assisting with the loading of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series into a C-5 Galaxy aircraft make sure the load is properly aligned before using the wench to pull it into the body of the aircraft Dec. 4, 2017, on Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado. A heavy duty wench capable of pulling well over 100 thousand pounds was used to tow the payload into a C-5 Galaxy for transport down to Cape Canaveral, FL. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke W. Nowakowski)

Buckley

Master Sgt. Jeff Gilbert, 337th Airlift Squadron loadmaster, tightens down a chain connecting the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series to the bed of a C-5 Galaxy aircraft Dec. 4, 2017, on Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado. At more than 100 thousand pounds, it is imperative that the GOES-R Series is correctly fastened to the transport aircraft to ensure safe arrival to Cape Canaveral, FL. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke W. Nowakowski)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --