Message from the 45th SW/CC

Facilities/Services Update

 
 
Location                                                                      
Status         
Notes                                                                                
 
Main Gate
 
East Gate
 
 
CCCAFS South Gate
 
 
Riverside Dining 
 
CCAFS Shoppette
 
Patrick Fitness Center
 
 
CCAFS Fitness Center
 
 
Commissary
 
 
Base Exchange Food Court
 
 
PAFB Express Station
 
 
Medical Group
 
 
Satellite Pharmacy
   
Vet Clinic
 
 
Base Exchange Optometry
 
 
Legal Office
 
 
Finance Office
 
 
MPF (ID Cards)
 
 
Airman Leadership School
 
 
Civilian Personnel
 
 
Child Development Center
 
 
Youth SAC Program
 
 
Youth Center
 
 
Base Education Center
 
 
AFRC
 
 
The Chapel
 
 
The Tides
 
 
The Library
 
 
Manatee Cove Golf Course/Food
 
 
Manatee Cove Marina
 
 
PAFB Beaches
 
 
The Beach House
 
 
Shark Lanes Food
 
 
Shark Lanes Bowling Café Bistro
 
 
Shark Lanes Bowling Center
 
 
NOTU Greenhouse
 
 
Launch Viewing
 
 
Lodging
 
 
Outdoor Recreation
 
 
Information, Tickets and Travel
 
 
Family Camp
 
 
Auto Services
 
 
Intramural Sports
 
 
Unite Program & Base Wide Events
 
 
Space Coast Credit Union
 
 
Barber Shop
 
 
CCAFS Barber Shop
 
 
CCAFS Fishing
 
 
Installation Personnel Readiness
 
 
Base Exchange
 
 
Military Clothing Sales
 
 
Burger King
   
CCAFS Café
 
 
Official Mail Center
 
 
 

Hurricane Information

Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. Potential threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30.

Hurricanes:
  • Can happen along any U.S. coast or in any territory in the Atlantic or Pacific oceans.
  • Can affect areas more than 100 miles inland.
  • Are most active in September.

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk of hurricanes.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • If you are at risk for flash flooding, watch for warning signs such as heavy rain.
  • Practice going to a safe shelter for high winds, such as a FEMA safe room or ICC 500 storm shelter. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room in a sturdy building on the lowest level that is not subject to flooding.
  • Based on your location and community plans, make your own plans for evacuation or sheltering in place.
  • Become familiar with your evacuation zone, the evacuation route, and shelter locations.
  • Gather needed supplies for at least three days. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets.
  • Keep important documents in a safe place or create password-protected digital copies.
  • Protect your property. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves in plumbing to prevent backups. Consider hurricane shutters. Review insurance policies.

Survive DURING

  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Do not drive around barricades.
  • If sheltering during high winds, go to a FEMA safe room, ICC 500 storm shelter, or a small, interior, windowless room or hallway on the lowest floor that is not subject to flooding.
  • If trapped in a building by flooding, go to the highest level of the building. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising flood water.
  • Listen for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery outdoors ONLY and away from windows.
  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown! Just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Listen to authorities for information and special instructions.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear protective clothing and work with someone else.
  • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Document any property damage with photographs. Contact your insurance company for assistance.