HomeNewsArticle Display

Patrick Airman helps save man’s life at Satellite Beach fitness center

Staff Sgt. Stafford Hampton II, 45th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman, used his Air Force Self-Aid Buddy Care skills to help save his friend’s life after he collapsed during his morning workout at a fitness center Jan. 26, 2017, in Satellite Beach, outside of Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. Without hesitation, Hampton performed chest compression on his friend to help keep his breathing steady until first responders arrived and transported his friend to the hospital, where he was treated and released. (U.S. Air Force photo/Phil Sunkel)

Staff Sgt. Stafford Hampton II, 45th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman, used his Air Force Self-Aid Buddy Care skills to help save his friend’s life after he collapsed during his morning workout at a fitness center Jan. 26, 2017, in Satellite Beach, outside of Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. Without hesitation, Hampton performed chest compression on his friend to help keep his breathing steady until first responders arrived and transported his friend to the hospital, where he was treated and released. (U.S. Air Force photo/Phil Sunkel)

PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- Staff Sgt. Stafford Hampton II, 45th Civil Engineer Squadron structural craftsman, was in the middle of his morning workout when his friend, Ted Scone, collapsed in the workout area on Jan. 26, 2017, in Satellite Beach, Fla.

 

“I heard some people frantically running toward him and a woman loudly asked someone to get the Automated External Defibrillator,” he said.

 

Without hesitation, Hampton stepped in to help save his friend’s life. After about 15-30 chest compressions, his friend began to gasp for air but was not able to sustain his breathing, shortly after.  

 

After a few failed attempts of using the AED, Hampton then tried manual chest compressions, which lead to arm movement.

 

“The AED was not able to find a rhythm in his pulse so it only shocked him once,” Hampton said. “There was a 12-second lull before the AED gave any feedback so I asked the lady assisting to power off the AED and I began chest compressions a second time.”

 

There was a period where there was absolutely no movement from Scone, and the AED was powered on but the battery was low.

 

After Hampton performed chest compressions, Scone made a deep gasp for air and his eyes started moving back and forth, which signaled life returning to his friend.

 

“I stayed with Scone and encouraged him to breathe and move more,” he said.  “I kept talking to him and tried to keep him steady until first responders arrived.”

 

Scone was then transported to a local hospital, where he was treated and released.

 

Combined with Hampton’s Air Force Self-Aid Buddy Care training and his instincts, he was able to step in, stay calm and tend to his friend’s condition, which ultimately led to saving his life.

 

“You never know when something like this will happen,” Hampton said. “I am just glad I was able to be there at the right time for my friend.”

 

Without Stafford’s help, Scone said he doesn't know where he would be today. 

“I am forever grateful to have a friend like him who I also consider family,” Scone said.  

 

Hampton’s supervisor, Tech. Sgt. Michael Seago, 45th Civil Engineer Squadron unit safety representative, echoed Ted’s praise.

“Hampton could have easily stood back in the crowd and let someone else handle it but that is not in his character," Seago said. "Sergeant Hampton is the type to step up without being asked.”

 

Editor’s Note: Self-Aid Buddy Care training fulfills an Expeditionary Skills Training requirement to produce deployment-ready Airmen. Self-Aid Buddy Care training provides knowledge and skills to minimize injury and prevent death or disability in deployed environments or home station emergencies.